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Wind Eroded Cave
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From the same carpark as for the Anvil Rock, a sign to the left marks the way for a 400-metre, 5-minute walk to the Wind Eroded Cave. Wind Eroded Cave ◄ Back Next ► Picture 1 of 4 Depending on the season, it is possible to see wild boronia, flannel flowers, Erica, mountain devil, banksia, grevillea, scribbly gums and other plant along the trail. The cave is more correctly a giant overhang, with extraordinary honeycomb formations in matching honey-coloured sedimentary rocks. As its name suggests, the formation was created by wind erosion, caused by particles in the air effectively...

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Lakes Entrance
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Lakes Entrance is a tourist resort and fishing town in East Gippsland, 320 km east of Melbourne. It was originally known by Europeans as Cunninghame after a prominent squatting family in the area, with a post office of the same name opening on 5 Feb 1870. It was renamed Lakes Entrance on 1 Jan 1915. As its name suggests, Lakes Entrance is the gateway that allows ocean-going vessels from Bass Strait and the Tasman Sea access to the Gippsland Lakes, the largest  navigable inland waterway (400 km2 in area) in Australia. Lake Entrance Lookout   The original access point...

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Stickwork
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If you are visiting Federation Square, do not miss its latest attraction besides Flinders Street – a colossal, startling art masterpiece by the American sculptor Patrick Dougherty. He bends, weaves, snags and flexes a humble pile of tree saplings and sticks to create works of art inseparable from nature and landscape. As the sculptures are made of organic matter, they disintegrate and fall apart, becoming part of the landscape once again. Most people see habitats and shelters in his work – which is what many of them are meant to be.   Over the last 25 years, he made...

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