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Shipley Plateau
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On the south western side of Blackheath, past the tiny hamlet of Shipley, are two lesser known but nevertheless equally spectacular lookouts – Hargraves Lookout and Mount Blackheath Lookout. To get to Shipley from Blackheath, cross the railway line at the traffic lights and head towards Megalong Valley where you will turn into Shipley Road. You will drive through lovely mountain landscapes with beautiful apple orchards, gum trees and lush foilage on the way to the Shipley Plateau, passing by the Shipley Gallery showcasing local artists (open weekends 10am- 4pm) on the left just before arriving at a fork...

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Anvil Rock
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Anvil Rock (GPS: 33.595487°S 150.339451°E) is an often overlooked attraction of the Blue Mountains. To get there, follow the mostly-gravel Hat Hill road from Blackheath. Any 2WD vehicle can traverse the road. On arriving at a fork, take the left turnoff to Anvil Rock. The right turnoff leads to Perrys Lookdown. The road continues for a further 500 metres to a small carpark. To the right, a sign marks the start of a short 0.5 km, 5 minutes moderate walk to the Anvil Rock overlooking the Grose Valley. Along this Anvil Rock Trail, you will come across a rustic...

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Evans Lookout
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Evans Lookout, located at the top of the escarpment at the end of Evans Lookout Road (GPS 33.647019°S 150.326796°E), provides an alternative vantage point for views of the Grose Valley. It is named after George Evans who discovered the lookout and the entry to the Grose Valley in 1882. There is a memorial erected to him at the site.   View of Grose Valley from Evans Lookout ◄ Back Next ► Picture 1 of 10   The area consists of Triassic sandstones and underlying Permian sedimentary rocks. A number of basalt capped peaks dominate the area, notably Mount Banks...

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Govetts Leap
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From Blackheath town centre, a short drive to the east takes visitors to Govetts Leap (GPS 33.627926°S 150.311518°E), a lookout with spectacular views of the Grose Valley and nearby waterfalls. Govetts Leap was named after William Romaine Govett, one of the first surveyors of the upper Blue Mountains, who discovered this spot in June 1831. Govetts Leap Lookout ◄ Back Next ► Picture 1 of 12   A horse and rider monument in the park beside the Great Western Highway at Blackheath village tells the story about Govetts Leap. There is a folklore legend that tells of an escaped...

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Blackheath
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Blackheath is located near the highest point (1065 metres) of the Blue Mountains, between Katoomba and Mount Victoria, about 120 km west northwest of Sydney CBD. With its lovely misty days when the clouds sit low over the mountains, Blackheath is reminiscent of a beautiful Scottish village.   History   The region was thought to be a summer corroboree meeting place for several Indigenous peoples of the Darug, Gundungurra and Wiradjuri nations. Following European settlement of Australia, the area was named Hounslow. After crossing the Blue Mountains in 1815 and returning from Bathurst, Governor Lachlan Macquarie renamed the settlement...

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Cape Conran
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Cape Conran Coastal Park is a coastal reserve located near Marlo in East Gippsland, 420 km east of Melbourne. It extends from west of Cape Conran and all along the coast to the neighbouring fishing village of Bemm River. The 11,700 hectare area was declared a coastal park under the National Parks Act in 1997. Salmon Rocks Lookout   Much of the area is covered by heathland and banksia woodlands which attracts nectar-feeding birds. Dolphins and whales (depending on the time of year) may be spotted off the coast. The abundant bird life includes White-bellied Sea Eagles and the...

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